Weaving with a Temple

My husband laughs at the terms I use in weaving. “You’re sleying the reed?? How is that even a thing?”

Well, now I’ve started using a “temple”! 😀

This is a device that forces the width of the woven piece to match up correctly with the “dents” in the reed (haha, there I go again). This stops the selvedges and edge warp threads from crowding inwards, and keeps the piece at the width that I want.

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Selvedges (red threads) are clipped to hanging weights

Mine is improvised from fishing sinker weights and some curtain clips I had lying around after putting up my Ikea curtain rods.

Every inch I weave, I re-clip the temple right up next to the weft threads.

Everything is now so straight and even! And I’m no longer breaking the edge warp ends because the metal reed is no longer rubbing them so hard.

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Sideways view of the weights

Each selvedge is weighted sideways with three of my new fishing sinkers (each one weighs 4 oz, or 115g). I am loving these! Ever since I tried them on my Birka tablet woven piece, I’m finding applications for them everywhere.

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Floating selvedges are weighted using fishing sinkers

This warp is going to make a pair of viking leg wraps, and so is not very wide (just shy of 3 inches). I’m thinking I may need more weight on a wider piece, but I will have to wait to test my theory until the next warp.

Which might be a twill colour gamp? Or a wider piece for making into a viking hood? I am feeling deliciously full of want-to-weave projects at the moment. 😀

2 thoughts on “Weaving with a Temple

    1. Thanks Cynthia! It is fun — especially once you get past warping up the loom. I can do about 40 cm in a session, I think. Maybe an hour or so? Quite pleasant to stand and do something simple with your hands and let your mind wander.

      At least, for this pattern. So brain-work required! 😀

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